IUI

Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a fertility treatment that involves placing sperm inside a woman’s uterus to facilitate fertilization. Theiui1 goal of IUI is to increase the number of sperm that reach the fallopian tubes and subsequently increase the chance of fertilization.Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a fertility treatment that involves placing sperm inside a woman’s uterus to facilitate fertilization. The goal of IUI is to increase the number of sperm that reach the fallopian tubes and subsequently increase the chance of fertilization. IUI provides the sperm an advantage by giving it a head start, but still requires a sperm to reach and fertilize the egg on its own. It is a less invasive and less expensive option compared to in vitro fertilization. You may be offered IUI if: •you are using donated sperm in your treatment (donor insemination) •you are unable (or would find it very difficult) to have vaginal intercourse, for example because of a physical disability or psychosexual problem •you have a condition that means you need specific help to conceive (for example, if you’re a man who is HIV positive and you have undergone sperm washing to reduce the risk of passing on the disease to your partner and potential child). In the past IUI was offered if you had unexplained infertility, mild endometriosis or when a male partner had mild fertility problems. However, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) (an organisation which provides national guidance and advice to improve health and social care) has advised that it should now not routinely be offered in these situations except for in exceptional circumstances. Instead, if this applies to you, you are advised to try to conceive for a total of two years before IVF will be considered (this can include up to one year before your fertility investigations).